Education Scholarship Event

June 17, 2016

Sheraton Imperial Hotel & Convention Center

Durham, NC

THE CHANGING JOB MARKET AND ITS IMPACT ON GRADUATES OF HBCUs

Issue Briefings are from 1:45 P.M. – 5:00 P.M.

Friday, June 17, 2015

 

 

ISSUE BRIEFINGS SESSION

1:45 P.M. – 3:15 P.M.

 

interviewdayToday’s college graduates will have to contend with an employment/labor market that is more mobile and competitive; they will switch jobs more frequently perhaps as often as every two years. They will face more pressure to keep skills current, as technology advances ever more quickly and changes in job requirements become more frequent. Finally, graduates will need to continuously update skills and education as skills will become obsolete more quickly.

 

According to an article in US News & World Report, the Consulting firm McKinsey & Company predicts that by 2020, there will be a shortage of 1.5 million college grads, which means employers will continue to place a high premium on better-educated workers. The number of jobs that require education beyond high school is expected to account for two-thirds of the job market by 2020.

 

New technology will continue to generate breakthroughs in medicine, manufacturing, transportation, and many other fields, which means there will be strong demand for graduates with degrees in biology, chemistry, engineering, and mathematics. However, prospects will also be good for liberal arts majors, although such jobs do not command the salaries of those with science or technical degrees. Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) must adapt and provide students majoring in liberal arts training and skills that can be transferred from one field to another, thus making such students more appealing to employers.

 

For graduates of HBCUs, there are still challenges of higher unemployment rates when compared with their white counterparts – due in part to persistent racial discrimination. Other challenges such as rising tuition costs and fees, changes in parent plus loans and various state and national policies are making college less affordable. However, securing a college education over time is still worth the cost. Securing an education has been and continues to be the route by which many individuals, especially minorities, enhance their well-being and quality of life. HBCUs continue to play a vital role in educational attainment for minorities, and the institutions continue to offer a return on investments for the students they serve.

 

Participants in this briefing will receive a review of the changing job market and its impact on graduates of North Carolina’s HBCUs. They will also be given an update on some of the more recent public policy measures that could further challenge the survival of the state’s HBCUs.

 

MODERATOR/PRESENTER:

Gladys_A._Robinson Senator Gladys Robinson

28th Senate District (Guilford)

 

 

 

 

 

PRESENTER:                                   

walden1Professor Michael Walden

 William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor

 North Carolina State University

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Issue Briefing is FREE, but REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED.

REGISTER NOW